Saturday, December 10, 2016

Your Dolphin Outlook Weekly Update!



On Wednesday this week, 25-30 pilot whales, including several juveniles are trapped in the cove. Ric O'Barry's Dolphin Project Cove Monitors observed them spyhopping, huddling close together and breathing rapidly – all obvious signs of distress after being aggressively driven in from wild waters. After a morning of slaughter the hunters are taking a break. Young juveniles have been trying to fight their way to adults. 6 skiffs have transported the lifeless bodies of Pilot whales. Juveniles are still netted, and awaiting their fate. Hunters are yet to return. 14 Pilot Whale juveniles are being driven back out to sea. A drive just as stressful as the drive into the cove. After the horror they experienced and without their families, they have little to no chance of survival on their own.

On Sunday this week, 7 bottlenose dolphins have been taken for a life in captivity. The remainder of the pod have been driven back out to sea. Very sad day here in Taiji.

And, on saturday last week, a pod of dolphins have been driven towards the harbor.
Dolphins are made to jump through rings of FIRE before being hauled from the water and crammed into tiny boxes in disturbing footage of Indonesian travelling circus 
In the shocking footage, dolphins are seen leaping out of the water through the narrow hoops, with flames brushing against their sensitive skin
A dolphin is caught in a net before being carried to an open top box for transportation
The harrowing footage shows dolphins being caught in nets before being transported in tiny pools hundreds of miles
Campaigners say many dolphins die because of the stress and lack of proper care
Activists have called for the cruel treatment of dolphins to be ended after the shocking footage emerged
Spectators cram in to watch the shows, which experts say is 'hell' for dolphins, which are acoustic animals
Animals are crammed into tiny spaces as they are transported hundreds of miles 
The footage, taken  at one of Indonesia's travelling circuses, was released by campaign group Ric O’Barry’s Dolphin Project.

Lincoln O'Barry, from the group, said: 'As hard as it is to believe, dolphin traveling circuses are a big hit in Indonesia.

'It's pretty barbaric. It's the only time I've seen dolphins jumping through a hoop of fire. It's definitely something from a bygone era.

A dolphin is caught in a net before being carried to an open top box for transportation
'While all captive dolphin facilities have welfare issues, the circuses in Indonesia seem decidedly crueler because they're traveling.

'The animals are frequently hauled out of their plastic performing pools and loaded into the back of trucks along with other animals as the circuses move from town to town.

'The transportation is so stressful for the animals that many of the dolphins die due to this stress and lack of proper care.

The harrowing footage shows dolphins being caught in nets before being transported in tiny pools hundreds of miles.

Campaigners say many dolphins die because of the stress and lack of proper care.

'There is also evidence that all of the dolphins have all been caught illegally from the wild.'
In the shocking footage, dolphins are seen leaping out of the water through the narrow hoops, with flames brushing against their sensitive skin.

After being made to perform, the 6ft-long bottlenose dolphins are hauled from the tiny pool and loaded into open-topped, water-filled wooden boxes.

They are put into trucks or loaded onto planes and made to travel hundreds of miles between shows in portable plastic pools filled with chlorine and artificial salt water.

Spectators cram in to watch the shows, which experts say is 'hell' for dolphins, which are acoustic animals.

Animals are crammed into tiny spaces as they are transported hundreds of miles.

Femke Den Haas, founder of Jakarta Animal Aid Network, said: 'It's extremely cruel. When I first learned about the traveling dolphin shows, I couldn't believe it.

'Dolphins are acoustic animals, so it's hell for them. They're in so much pain being exposed to this amount of noise.' 

The Dolphin Project claims there are currently 72 dolphins being kept captive illegally in the country, where travelling circuses are very popular.

WSI, Taman Safari Indonesia and Ancol are companies which run dolphin shows on the main Indonesian island of Java.

The charity aims to stop the exploitation and slaughter of dolphins.

It was set up in 1970 by Ric O'Barry, a former employee at the Miami Seaquarium, where he captured and trained dolphins.

Dolphins Beat Each Other Up Because They’re So Stressed In Tiny Tank. "They are literally living in a toilet bowl." A troubling video (posted this week) shows two bottlenose dolphins and a Pacific white-sided dolphin thrashing around in a tiny tank. They swim in frantic circles, banging into each other and jumping in and out of the water. The dolphins appear to have rake marks (scratches from another dolphin's teeth) and nicks across their bodies.

These wild dolphins were yanked from the ocean and placed inside a "show tank" at the Taiji Whale Museum in Taiji, Japan. Visitors can walk up to the tank to take photographs or pay to feed the dolphins pieces of dead fish. The dolphins are being kept in the tank as they wait to perform in one of the museum's shows, Christine Gau, program coordinator for Ric O'Barry's Dolphin Project, told The Dodo.

Ric O'Barry, founder of Dolphin Project and a former dolphin trainer who was featured in the 2009 film "The Cove," told The Dodo that he believes the Pacific white-sided dolphin was getting bullied.
"In the wild, dolphins can get away from one another when they are being bullied," O'Barry said. "As you can see in the video, a dolphin is being constantly harassed and bullied and can't get away. It's just one more example of why captivity does not work."

Infighting can be a problem among marine mammals in captivity, often due to the stress of captivity. The rake marks are usually the result of aggressive behavior.
"You see that in captivity," Courtney Vail, marine consultant for the Animal Welfare Institute (AWI), told The Dodo. "You see heavily raked dolphins — it's a product of aggression or just inappropriate social structure in that kind of grouping."
Not much is known about the dolphins' individual histories, but Gau is certain the dolphins were captured during Japan's annual dolphin drives in Taiji, Japan — probably in last year's hunt.
Every year between September and March, Japanese fishermen drive entire pods of wild dolphins into a notorious killing cove by hitting metal poles on their boats with hammers, which disrupts dolphins' sonar capacities and creates a "wall" of sound. Once the dolphins are rounded up, people choose the most "attractive" ones to sell to dolphinariums and swim-with-the-dolphin programs, mostly in Asia and the Middle East.

The remaining dolphins are murdered for their meat, often right in front of their family members. On killing days, the cove runs red with the dolphins' blood.
"These animals have been traumatized by the entire process of being driven into the cove," Vail said. "If they even survive that, they are behind the curve psychologically and physically."

But the trauma doesn't end there. The survivors then face a lifetime of captivity.
For the dolphins in the video (which was captured by Ric O'Barry's Dolphin Project), their lives are now confined to a cramped outdoor tank. While the exact measurements of the tank are unknown, Gau estimates that it's only about 60 feet long and 10 to 15 feet deep.

Whatever the size, it doesn't seem big enough for one dolphin, let alone three.
The water condition is also terrible. "Being in the vicinity we can smell chlorine, so the water is being treated," Gau explained. "The saltwater is laced with chlorine and copper sulfate in order to kill the heavy bacteria buildup. Dolphins urinate and defecate three to five times the amount that humans do. They are literally living in a toilet bowl. Ironically, the sea is only a few hundred meters away from the show tank. So is a kiosk which sells dolphin meat."
Besides these deplorable living conditions, bottlenose dolphins and Pacific wide-sided dolphins don't normally live together, so their cohabitation would probably cause extra tension. "They're not species who normally associate in the wild," Vail said. "It's difficult to see such amazing creatures in such small quarters, obviously, and in such horrible conditions."
"Since they're different species entirely they wouldn't associate in nature," Gau said. "They speak different languages and in the open ocean the pods would probably never interact or would steer clear of each other. Being forced to share a small space with a stranger can lead to added stress."
Sadly, Vail doesn't see much of a future for these dolphins. "I don't anticipate many of those dolphins surviving long in the whale museum, just considering the trauma they've been through, on the front end, and then the poor care and conditions on the back end," she said.
In the wild, both bottlenose dolphins and Pacific white-sided dolphins can live for more than 40 years. But in captivity, dolphins may only live for five years.

The situation might seem hopeless, but there are some simple things you can do.. You can help Ric O'Barry's Dolphin Project continue to monitor Taiji by making a donation here. You can also visit The Dolphin Project to sign a petition and learn more about how you can help stop the hunt in Taiji.
 



 
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